Step 4: Find your “flow”

Immersing yourself completely in an activity you love is far more rejuvenating than  collapsing on the sofa every night.

Watching TV may seem like a relaxing activity, but it doesn’t require involvement from your brain – allowing it to wander and start worrying about things.

“Flow” is immersing yourself totally in an activity so that your brain can’t focus on anything else. It will give you a warm and lasting glow of satisfaction.

Do anything that you find pleasurable – playing netball, singing really loudly to your favourite song, or cooking a feast for your family.

Source: Prima magazine

Not sure personally about the ‘cooking a feast for your family’ bit, but I’ve found singing lessons incredibly relaxing as they require a great deal of concentration on breathing, posture and diction, not to mention the actual notes you must sing.

Likewise, colouring Mandalas (there are a huge number you can download on the internet) – my children love them and you have a guaranteed period of calm when they are doing them. If you are interested, look at this selection:

http://www.coloringcastle.com/mandala_coloring_pages.html

I once witnessed Buddhist monks making a sand mandala in the hallway of Bordeaux II, place de la Victoire, where I used to work.  It was something to watch. Here’s a link to a BBC article on something similar that took place in Manchester.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/buddhism/customs/mandala.shtml

So what is your “flow”?

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